I made a beautiful and healthy pizza for supper last night with whole wheat and almond flours. I added a quarter cup of the latter to cut the carb content, but it doesn’t move the calories south at all. The mix takes 1 package yeast, 1/2 Cup warm water and 1 teaspoon actual sugar (yeast food).

Set this aside to focus on mixing up the flours—1 Cup whole wheat and 1/4 Cup almond flour. If you don’t have the almond flour, use all wheat, but the carb count is more. I didn’t use salt, since the spice mix I use has salt in it. I put a tablespoon of spice into the dough, poured the yeast mix into it, and kneaded the dough for about 5 minutes.

You might need to dust your board with flour if it begins to stick. I always work on parchment paper because I can slip that into the oven and not disturb the pizza. Shape it into a circle or rectangle, but don’t won’t if it’s not perfect. It is artisan pizza, handmade by an artist, and unique, not churned out by the thousands to be exactly alike.

I chopped 6 ounces of fresh tomatoes to put on the rolled out dough, which had a tablespoon of olive oil rubbed into it to seal it up. I left all the extra juice on the chopping board. Six ounces of Kraft Italian cheeses from the package, 8 ounces of precooked chicken, a dozen asparagus half cooked in the microwave, and a generous sprinkling of an Italian spice blend, heavy on the garlic, and it went into a preheated oven at 425 F.

I set the timer for 20 minutes and went into the living room to watch the news to find out if our present administration had given away the keys to the store. We seem to be safe for another 24 hours. As the program ended, the buzzer sounded, so I walked into my kitchen.

Once I got near, the aromas of pizza began to waft out from the oven. The good smells are the result of the food reaching an appropriate high temperature to release the scents, which are the result of chemical reactions taking place in your pizza or other recipe.

Another test for pizza doneness is the eyeball—the crust should be browned and the cheese bubbly. I tend to like my pizza crunchy, so I might cook it about 5 minutes longer than most. I also cook it on a pizza stone, which evens out the heat and keeps the crust proper.

The protein and carbohydrates are about equal in this recipe, so the pizza will stick to your ribs. Two slices is a whole meal of around 400-500 calories. It’s also very tasty. Other virtues are it’s ready in about 30 minutes and uses leftovers. It’s a good way to use up the last of the spinach, mushrooms, or any other veggie that won’t serve the whole family. Plus you can make one side meatless if someone in the family is abstaining from flesh.

The only negative is cleanup, but I’d assign that to someone who didn’t cook. For the individuals living single, I believe treating yourself to special cooking by an artisan chef is a pampering we all can appreciate, and we can save about $20 in the process. I can clean up my own pots and pans for that $20, thank you. And feel virtuous enough to either save it in my coffee can for my vacation or enjoy my fancy pants coffee without shame.

I have to admit, I no longer visit the local pizza joints as often since I discovered how simple pizza is to make. Twenty minutes of this recipe is sitting down and doing something else–this is just my style! I hope you try this Artisan Pizza Recipe. Tell me how it goes for you.

Love, Cornie

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Eagle Brand Coffee

Drinking Eagle Brand Coffee this morning. I wondered who to root for last night for the big football game. My head said Patriots, but my heart said Eagles. Tom Brady, my head said, is the best quarterback around. What do you know about this backup from the Eagles?

My heart answered, but you love the underdogs, the unappreciated, and the undervalued. Why not go with your heart, since it’s the seat of your feelings, and you trust those more than the logic of your mind. Anyway, it’s just a game, and it’ll be interesting any way it turns out.

Some of my friends gathered to “watch the game,” but as in any party, some are there for the food, some for the commercials, some for the fellowship, and a die hard few for the actual game. The evening is for all, and we don’t all have to do the same thing. We can wander in and out, tasting and experiencing it all, or we can stick with one thing.

We don’t have to be all alike, since we celebrate freedom in America. We don’t even have to think alike or root for the same teams. We forget how blessed we are when we let petty people and politics divide us. If we sought instead to find what unites us, we’d recover the common ground.

After all, those who seek to divide us do this for their best interests, and not for ours. If we separate into easily defined subgroups, they can market to us, they can count us, and they can court us. Perhaps if we began to look for the humanity of the others in our midst and walk a mile in their shoes, we would no longer think of them as “others ” but as brothers and sisters.

Posted in Coffee, coffee, Food, Friendship, politics, Relationships, Super Bowl, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Herding Cats and Food Jags

Cat food. People food. Ever get too much of a good thing?

Folks who grew up in the Great Depression were glad to have chicken on Sundays. In Louisiana, politicians promised “a chicken in every pot and every man a king.” My family ate fried chicken at my grandparents’ home every week, until my Nannie passed away.

When that happened, my daddy let my mother know we should plan a different menu for Sunday lunch, that is, anything as long as it wasn’t fried chicken. He was tired of the same meal week in and week out. Mother went along with this, for she knew it wouldn’t be too long before daddy would be craving some fried chicken. She was right. It wasn’t worth arguing over.

Grief hits everyone differently. My dad kept his feelings about the unchanging menu to himself for the sake of family harmony. Mother kept her grief and loss sublimated to care for her father and our family, even if she allowed herself to cry on the anniversary of her mother’s death every year.

I’ve gone on food jags before, and then lost my taste for that food. I find I crave snack foods and breads when I’m stressed, but when the stressor leaves my life, I wonder why I have this unopened bag of potato chips on the top shelf of my cabinet. Go figure! Since I have to pull out the step stool to get it, I have to think twice, “Do I truly want this or do I merely crave it?” I find myself leaving it there more often than not.

Maybe the “cat diet tips” can help you with your cravings too. Just think of your unhealthy food choices as the “cat’s favorite wet food” —just like a perverse kitty, yass—I’m not going to eat it, just cause!

Posted in cats, Comfort food, Depression, Depression era, emotional eating, family, Food, Generations, Great Depression, Grief, Health, hunger, Southern Culture | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tide Pod Donuts—NO.

NO. Tide Pods Challenge transformed into Edibles.

A doughnut shop in Missouri has gone with the stream and made a themed treat after the Tide Pod Challenge. As a proponent of healthy eating, I don’t think two wrongs ever make a right. The doughnut isn’t a poison, like the laundry detergent, but for some of us, it remains a toxic food.

For persons with metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, diabetes, PCOS, or any other insulin resistant condition, the doughnut’s combination of fat, sugar and flour and high carbohydrates is a dangerous pill to swallow. When I was young, I could eat these treats.

As my body has aged, my pancreas no longer responds to a high carbohydrate diet. I find I can’t lose weight if I have 40 grams of carbs at one sitting. This cancels out pasta, one of my favorite foods. Instead, I’ve been making pasta from zucchini and summer squash, two very low glycemic vegetables. I limit pasta to once a week treats.

I keep a food diary, so I know what is working. I only make one change at a time, so I can tell if it makes a difference. I keep things simple. Also, it’s less stress to change one thing and get it part of your lifestyle before you make another change. For those of you who are all or nothing folks, my guess is you went on a “complete whole change” on January First, and are back at square one now. That’s why this practice is called all or nothing—it usually winds up as nothing.

Small, consistent changes over a long period of time will prove out for steady results, which will hold up for the duration. It takes an average 66 days to build a habit. Some folks take as many as 254 days to get in the groove. We’d like for it to be 21 days, which is the common myth, but like eating Tide Pod Donuts, the sweet thing isn’t always the right thing for us.

Posted in Comfort food, deserts, Food, Health, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Prediabetes, processed foods | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment


Some of us toss out the living room Christmas tree on December 26th, because it’s been up since Thanksgiving Day. Christmas Day begins the 12 days of Christmas, a celebration that ends on January 6th with the visit of the wise men to the baby Jesus’s birthplace. You can make variations of the Christmas tree with pancakes and eat them for supper or breakfast.

Make them with whole wheat flour and get the whole grain benefits. Cornie’s BASIC PANCAKE RECIPE is at the link below. SparkRecipes requires a free account to login, but it gets you access to a recipe calculator. This is a handy tool you can use to input your own recipes and figure the calories, carbs, and protein figures of your meals.

In the new year, we can be more conscious of our health by knowing what we eat and how it affects our health. I reworked my traditional family recipes to cut the fat, salt, and carbohydrates so I could avoid the diabetes which runs in my family. This isn’t something a person can do cold turkey or make the change all at once, but by cutting back these three things a little at a time over a period of a year, my tastebuds adjusted to the new normal.

Best wishes for the days to come! Better health for all of us!

Love, Cornie

Posted in Calendar, christmas, Comfort food, disease, family, Food, Health, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Holidays, New year, Prediabetes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Christmas Baking for Emotional Eaters

I’m in Christmas cooking mode for the holidays in Cornie’s Kitchen for the month of December. Some of my favorite people who stop by for a visit might be drawn by some wonderful and enticing smells emanating from the door of my cozy condo home.

My mother was always baking at Christmas time, as was her mother before her. I never was in my great grandmother’s home at Christmas, or I was too young to recall her traditions. I do know she had an old cast iron wood fired stove. She must have had some skills to keep an even temperature for baking her homemade breads and cookies.

One of my earliest childhood memories at Christmas time is my mother in her bathrobe racing out of the little wood frame home in which we lived before my youngest brother was born. She was holding the foil wrapped fruitcakes in her hands and shouting for my daddy, who was backing up the brand new shining brown Pontiac as he was headed off to work.

Over the years, the fruit cake became cookies with candied fruits and brandy, for they knew more people to “gift” at Christmas time. Everyone needs a little something to know you care about them, now and then.

A homemade treat is the best, for you can expend your energies and anxieties in the working of the ingredients. As you smell and touch the different items which go into the treat, the part of your need to consume is already being sated by these sensations.

As you mix by hand—and I’m old school, I don’t use a blender or processor—you use up calories. If we are PWO (persons with obesity) we need to use all the energy we can. Also, doing this by hand gives us an immediate and direct connection with the food we’re making. We’ll feel the textures, the densities, and the thickness or thinness of our product. We’ll have a “feel for it.”

Could you make this quicker if you used electric tools? Yes. Would you lose the meditative opportunity to become “one with the food?” Also yes. I also think you’d be tempted to eat much more of the food if made more quickly, for slow food sates the emotional needs we have which cause us to overeat beyond what is necessary. As we wait for the the appropriate smell to waft from the oven, or the timer to go off to let us know the candy has chilled in the icebox, we can clean up the kitchen or have a little time to put our feet up with a cup of our kitchen’s best. Or maybe both. We shouldn’t work too hard after all.

When the goodies are ready, we divide them up, but there’s alway a few irregular ones, a little too imperfect to gift away. These will eat just as good, even if they don’t look so good. For quality control reasons, at Cornie’s Kitchen, I eat the broken ones, always remembering portion control. After cooking and cleaning, I find I don’t need all that many. If we know the effort our food takes, this might be the best argument for portion control yet.

Let’s cook more often, and take out less. We could practice “Life by Fork” instead of “Death by Fork.”

Love, Cornie

Posted in christmas, coffee, Comfort food, deserts, disease, emotional eating, Exercise, family, Food, Generations, Health, Holidays, hunger, processed foods, sharing, Spirituality, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leftovers For Cinderella


I ate the traditional Thanksgiving dinner at a family setting Thursday, along with slivers of pies. The pot roast I made earlier got recycled as soup for two days after Thanksgiving. I had baked chicken with leftover carnival squash and roasted eggplant for dinner one night.

You can see the eggplant in the first soup bowl. I added some spinach and mushrooms to the potato and beef soup just to jazz it up and make it different from the asparagus and broccoli variation of the day before, which is below.

For Sunday breakfast I had French toast. I use vanilla, cinnamon, and 2 eggs with Dave’s killer bread. In a hot skillet, I pot 1 Tbs. sweet butter and cook the soaked bread slices until they’re golden brown. Then I add 1Tbs of maple syrup over the top. Using the real thing means I don’t need a lot, and often have some left over.

These are easy meals. I used the microwave to hasten the potato’s cooking to doneness, as also the asparagus stems. When you cook ahead, you have a quick dinner to make on another evening. It looks fresh by adding different veggies.

As we wind down this old year, time will compress, but obligations will mount up. We’ll be trying to squeeze a size ten foot into a size six shoe. It won’t work. We aren’t Cinderella! Take your list and chop it in half. Just do it. Spend more time being good to the ones you love. Spend less money on them. Enjoy each other’s company.

Joy and Peace, Cornie

Posted in Comfort food, family, Food, Holidays, love, menu, New year, Relationships, thanksgiving, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment