Black Bean Pizza Crust

BLACK BEAN PIZZA CRUST

The end of the old year always makes me rethink my food choices for the new year. Perhaps the numerous cookies I quality tested also encouraged my recipe experiments. I always try to modify my recipes toward the healthier side, even while I keep the good taste. I’ve made great whole wheat and almond flour pizza crusts and I enjoyed the beautiful, red beet crust variation. What would a black bean crust taste like? My “wild side” wants to know!

Ingredients for one large single pizza crust—
¾ cup black beans (about ½ of a 15oz can) = 7.5 oz low salt beans
7 oz water warm
1¼ tsp sugar (or sweetener of choice, optional, but recommended to feed the yeast)
2¼ tsp yeast = 1 package
2 tsp olive oil
1/4 cup almond flour
1 1/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 tsp salt

Black Bean Pizza Crust

1 Drain beans, then mash with a fork, or purée in a blender or food processor until smooth. Add water as necessary (in 1 Tbsp increments).
2 Whisk together warm water, sugar, yeast, and bean purée.
3 Mix together flours and salt, add slowly to yeast mixture (if not using a bread machine, stir as flour mixture is added).
4 Knead until the dough is elastic.
5 Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
6 Shape pizza dough on baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
7 Arrange toppings and sauce of your choice on top of shaped dough. Put half of cheese on dough, then tomatoes, spinach, spices, rest of cheese, finishing with tomatoes, and dusting with more spices.
8 Bake 15 to 20 minutes (or until toppings are cooked through). Cut into 8 pieces. Two pieces make a very filling meal for most ladies. One piece would fill a child, and a hungry man might three.

Nutrition for Black Bean Pizza Crust

I admit the crust doesn’t taste much like a typical pizza, yet I enjoyed the difference. It does need a tad longer to cook, and the moisture in the beans are the reason for that. It might be best to go all “Mexican” with the seasoning, as well as to use a ground beef for the protein. A habanero jack cheese would be excellent too. In the new year, we might “walk on the wild side” with our recipe choices on occasion! I hope you enjoy it and have a blessed New Year!

Joy and Peace, Cornie

OTHER INGREDIENTS FOR FULLY DRESSED PIZZA:

Pizza blend cheese 8 oz x 80 is 640 calories
Tomatoes 3 oz x 8 servings is 24 oz is 600 calories
Baby spinach 6 oz is 40 calories
Mushrooms 1 cup is 15 calories
Chicken breast 8 oz is 272
Total pie topping = 1567 calories or each serving is 195 calories

896 calories total for 8 servings = 112 calories for crust
Total pie topping = 1567 calories or each serving is 195 calories
Each serving total is 307 calories total.

Advertisements

Spicy Sweet Nut and Seed Mix

Cold and grey weather in December makes me want to bake in the kitchen. I must have my mother’s DNA for sure, since some of my fondest memories are of her up to her elbows into a giant mixing bowl as she stirred together the various candied fruits and nuts for the fruit cake cookies and loaves she produced in mass quantities every Christmas.

This recipe also had a significant amount of cheap whiskey in it, so when I was preaching in small towns in Arkansas, I usually let one of the ladies of the church know of my need. “Don’t you worry,” they’d tell me, “we’ll make sure this gets covered.”

A few days later I’d be invited over to this kind lady’s home for lunch. She’d have a Christmas gift for me. Inside the colorful bag would be a small flagon, double wrapped in a brown paper bag. “You don’t have to tell anyone where you got it. That’s a secret, just between you and me.”

I’d nod and smile. Christmas has always been time for secrets. My parents would hide presents up in the attic until we got big enough to pull the rope for the hidden stairs. Then they hid the gifts in the trunk of my daddy’s black Pontiac. I never knew why we weren’t able to find the keys. When we were truly old, my folks managed to keep the Christmas secrets by gift wrapping the presents at the store before we came home from school.

One of the mysteries of Christmas I discovered along the way was Santa could write as elegantly as my daddy, but I never told anyone else. After all, I had two younger siblings and I wouldn’t want to spoil his visits for them! This recipe makes a Spicy Sweet Nut and Seed Mix for snacks. You can vary it infinitely and even use it as a base for a Chocolate Bark recipe. It’s great for a share party.

Fresh out of the oven!

Ingredients

4 cups unsalted, roasted whole nuts (almonds, pecans, pistachios, and walnuts)

1 cup seeds (I used pumpkin, quinoa, and sunflower)

1/4 cup agave

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 teaspoon red-pepper flakes

1 Tbs brandy

227 grams chocolate chips (1 cup)

1 teaspoon kosher salt (divided)

1 teaspoon turbinado sugar

Red pepper flakes from three chili peppers

Step 1

Heat the oven to 325 degrees and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the nuts and seeds.

Step 2

In a microwave-safe bowl, combine agave, butter, red-pepper flakes and ½ teaspoon salt. Microwave until the butter has melted, about 30-40 seconds. (Alternatively, you can melt the mixture in a small saucepan on the stove.)

Step 3

Pour the butter mix over the nuts and seeds, and stir until well coated. Dump onto the prepared baking sheet and spread in an even layer. You want the nut mix spread out as much as possible.

Step 4

Bake, stirring occasionally, until the nuts are tacky and look and smell toasted, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and immediately sprinkle over the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and all of the turbinado or dark brown sugar. Let cool on the baking sheet, then transfer to a bowl and serve (or transfer to an airtight container, where they’ll keep for up to 4 days).

Nutrition information for 1 serving (24 total servings)

Artisan Beet Crust Pizza

ARTISAN BEET CRUST PIZZA

Everyone wants to eat more veggies! In fact, I hear the latest food fad is coffee with mushrooms or broccoli added to it. Some toney java joints serve coffee inside carrots, avocados, or tomatoes. I like my coffee in a plain mug, and my veggies in soups or casseroles. Lately I’ve thrown a produce aisle on my pizza, so rather than the meat lover’s pizza, I create a veggie lover’s pizza.

Using fresh ingredients and a made from scratch dough, the pie can be ready in about the same time as a delivery pizza, but at less cost, and much healthier, especially if you’re watching your salt intake. I used some almond flour to cut the carbs of the crust, plus the veggies add some extra fiber.

Dissolve in 0.25 cup (4 fl oz) Water, tap warm,
1 tbsp Active Dry Yeast
1 tbsp Agave Nectar (Wholesome Organic Blue Agave)
1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Set aside and mix together the spices:
1 tsp Garlic powder
1 tsp Oregano, ground
1 tbsp Parsley, dried
1 tbsp Basil

In separate bowl sift together
0.25 tsp Salt
0.75 cup Whole Wheat Flour
1 serving Bob’s Red Mill Almond Flour, per 1/4 Cup
Then add the yeast mix and stir.

Add in 1 beet (2″ dia) Beets, fresh, cooked tender, and chopped fine.

Combine well and kneed until stretchy.
Might need 0.25 cup Whole Wheat Flour to keep dough from sticking to surface.

Use rolling pin or hands to push dough into about a 12” circle.
Drizzle 1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil over surface to seal it.

Layers of veggies on pizza, without the tomatoes

Layer these toppings on pizza—
4 oz Spinach – Dole Baby Spinach
226 gram Kroger all natural cheese pizza blend or 8 ounces
1 cup, pieces or slices Mushrooms, fresh
4 oz Beef, 90% Lean Ground Beef from Sirloin
6 oz Tomato, grape (3oz = appro 12 tomatoes) sliced

Sprinkle dry spices over the top, or some on the inside or some inside too.

Crimp up edges to keep the food inside the outer walls of your pizza.

Bake in preheated 425 F oven on middle rack on pizza stone for best texture. It takes 15 to 20 minutes, depending on oven & cooking surface. Cheese should be melted and crust tender but not crispy.

Tips

If you roll out on parchment paper on top of a cutting board, you can slide the pizza still on the paper onto your hot stone in the oven. This way you don’t ruin the dough by picking it up. This takes the place of a “Baker’s paddle” at a pizzeria.
You could make the crust with spinach for a green crust on St. Patrick’s Day.

Directions
425 F preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the oven.

Serving Size: 8 slices of the pizza—I usually eat 2 normally, or 3 if I’m ravenous.

Reheating pizza—put slices on parchment paper in cold oven. Turn to 350F, and remove when you smell it, about 10 minutes. Don’t reheat in microwave.

The nutrition facts are from SparkRecipes. It’s a handy app for creating your own recipes and knowing the nutritional information of the food you eat. I hope you enjoy this pizza! You can modify it any number of ways.

CORNIE’S KITCHEN PIZZA RECIPES at this link—free registration

https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/cookbooks.asp?cookbook=1113303

Nutrition Facts
Servings Per Recipe: 8
Serving Size: 1 serving
Amount Per Serving
Calories 235.3
Total Fat 13.0 g
Saturated Fat 4.7 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 2.5 g
Cholesterol 28.9 mg
Sodium 294.1 mg
Potassium 153.8 mg
Total Carbohydrate 19.1 g
Dietary Fiber 3.5 g
Sugars 3.8 g
Protein 15.2 g
Vitamin A 33.7 %
Vitamin B-12 0.1 %
Vitamin B-6 1.6 %
Vitamin C 18.5 %
Vitamin D 1.7 %
Vitamin E 4.6 %
Calcium 23.1 %
Copper 2.0 %
Folate 10.1 %
Iron 7.8 %
Magnesium 6.2 %
Manganese 10.2 %
Niacin 2.0 %
Pantothenic Acid 1.5 %
Phosphorus 1.4 %
Riboflavin 4.2 %
Selenium 1.5 %
Thiamin 0.9 %
Zinc 0.7 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Beet Crust Pizza

For some reason, when I go into my kitchen, I like to walk on the wild side. Do I go there in real life? Never–you won’t find me climbing up a rock face or hanging off the side of a cliff. When I went to Masada, the ancient fortress where the Jews held out against the overwhelming Roman army which surrounded their mountain fortress, I was terrified as I rode the air tram up to the top. Then I discovered I had to walk on an exterior cantilevered sidewalk hanging out over the valley below to get inside the historic site.

Beet Crust Pizza with Spinach and Chicken

Once I was on solid ground, I could enjoy myself. Going back down I could do, since I’d survived it already one time. Cooking adventures in my kitchen aren’t exactly survival shows like Chopped or Naked and Afraid. Too much drama in those for me! I tend to get an idea in mind, lay out all the ingredients, and start the process. Sometimes I make it up as I go, and other times I’ve read an interesting recipe in the newspaper or on the internet. Most of the time I make a variation on the recipe for my own health’s sake to limit the salt, sugar, and fat in the mix. I use whole grain flour and extra virgin olive oil when I bake, and fresh foods whenever possible. Using foods in season keeps the grocery bill reasonable and assures a variety of nutrients in my menu too.

I had a craving for beets last week, so ate them in salads because of the hot weather. I had a lonely beet left in the veggie compartment, so rather than let it go to waste, I washed, peeled , diced , and microwaved it for 5 minutes until very soft. Then I mushed with a fork. While this was cooking, I combined in a cup 1 tbsp Active Dry Yeast, 1 tbsp Agave Nectar (Wholesome Organic Blue Agave), and .25 cup (8 fl oz) hot Water from the tap.

As the yeast was bubbling, I was sifting the dry ingredients together in a large bowl:

0.75 cup Whole Wheat Flour

1 serving Bob’s Red Mill Almond Flour – per 1/4 Cup

.25 tsp Salt

Then I added the mushed beets, the yeast mix, and ADD 1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Stir together well. If the mix won’t combine into a ball, add just enough water to make it so.

Turn the crust out onto parchment paper. Use .25 Cup Whole Wheat Flour to kneed the dough for a few minutes. Then roll out the crust to an even thinness. It should be about 12 inches in diameter.

Rub 1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil into the surface of the crust to seal it. Add the toppings onto the crust:

4 oz Spinach – Dole Baby Spinach

226 gram Kroger all natural cheese pizza blend (8 oz)

8 ounces Chicken Breast (cooked), no skin, roasted, chopped

Sprinkle the spices over the top evenly:

1 tsp Garlic powder, 1 tbsp Basil, 1 tbsp Parsley, dried; and 1 tsp Oregano, ground

Cut into thin slices about 6 ounces or 168 grams Tomatoes, (red, ripe, raw, year round average) and arrange around the outer edge.

To finish off the presentation, turn up the edges of the crust and press down so the fillings don’t ooze out. The cooked crust is a surprising pink and the topping is a rich filling delight.

Minutes to Prepare: 15

Minutes to Cook: 20 at 425 F preheated oven

(15 to 20 minutes, depending on the oven)

Number of Servings: 8 single pieces–kids or 4 servings (2 slices) for adults

Tips: You could make the crust with chopped spinach for a green crust on St. Patrick’s Day.

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Calories in Beet Crust Pizza with Chicken and Spinach

Serving Size: 8 slices of the pizza—I usually eat 2 normally, or 3 if I’m ravenous.

Number of Servings: 8

• Calories: 242.1

• Total Fat: 12.6 g

• Cholesterol: 37.7 mg

• Sodium: 302.0 mg

• Total Carbs: 18.3 g

• Dietary Fiber: 3.6 g

• Protein: 18.7 g

Calories per serving of Beet Crust Pizza with Chicken and Spinach

81 calories of Kroger all natural cheese pizza blend, (28.25 gram)

37 calories of Whole Wheat Flour, (0.09 cup)

34 calories of Chicken Breast (cooked), no skin, roasted, (1 ounces)

21 calories of Bob’s Red Mill Almond Flour – per 1/4 Cup, (0.13 serving)

16 calories of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, (0.13 tbsp)

16 calories of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, (0.13 tbsp)

12 calories of Whole Wheat Flour, (0.03 cup)

8 calories of Agave Nectar (Wholesome Organic Blue Agave), (0.13 tbsp)

5 calories of Beets, fresh, (0.13 beet (2″ dia))

5 calories of Active Dry Yeast, (0.13 tbsp)

4 calories of Tomatoes, red, ripe, raw, year round average, (21 grams)

3 calories of Spinach – Dole Baby Spinach, (0.50 oz)

1 calories of Garlic powder, (0.13 tsp)

1 calories of Oregano, ground, (0.13 tsp)

0 calories of Parsley, dried, (0.13 tbsp)

0 calories of Basil, (0.13 tbsp)

SHARK WEEK CHOCOLATE BARK

Shark Week always grabs my attention. After all, that’s what sharks do! Or maybe because it’s far too hot to be outside in Arkansas or because my inner child loves to learn new things. I always loved the beach as a child, since the sea breezes kept the heat tolerable. Inland, folks just suffered in the sweltering humidity pods. Thankfully we now have modern air conditioning, an invention that didn’t come to my home until I was a teenager.

When the temperature was 99F at 10 PM, even a ceiling fan wouldn’t make sleeping comfortable. Cooking was out of the question. Daddy would barbecue or we’d eat cold cuts and fruit. Chocolate candy bark didn’t take long to heat on the stove, so it was a treat to make in the cooler mornings. It also reminds me of coral reefs, which Shark Week shows us nightly on the Discovery Channel.

Corals come in a wide array of shapes, sizes, and colors. Some resemble deer antlers, trees, giant fans, brains, and honeycomb. Although many corals may look like plants, they’re actually animals; they’re most closely related to jellyfish and anemones. There are three different types of coral reef formations—barrier reefs, coral atolls, and fringing reefs. Barrier reefs help to protect lagoons and other types of shallow water; coral atolls (which are often mistaken for islands) are made from volcanic remains; and fringing reefs are found right along the coastline.

Coral reefs, which only grow at a maximum depth of around 150 feet, also grow very slowly, at an average rate of just two centimeters per year. This is because their biomes must maintain a temperature of 70 to 85º Fahrenheit. (Shallow water is more easily warmed by the sun.) Strangely, most coral reefs seem to grow on the eastern side of land masses, where the temperature is believed to be warmer than the western side. Stony coral groups are primarily responsible for building up reef structures.  Coral reefs grow upward from the sea floor as the polyps of new corals cement themselves to the skeletons of those below.

When I make Shark Week Chocolate Bark, I gather the following dry ingredients in a plastic bag or in a bowl:

120 gram(s) Wonderful Pistachios Roasted & Salted Shelled Pistachios

0.5 cup Dried cherries (tart montmorency)

12 pretzels Splits pretzels—break into pieces 1 inch long (I used the broken pieces in the bottom of the bag).

Also needed:

1 tbsp Vanilla extract —divided into 2 tsp and 1 tsp

12 tsp Coconut Sugar—divided into 8 tsp and 4 tsp

Then I weigh out 571 gram(s) GHIRARDELLI chocolate premium baking chips 60% cacao bittersweet chocolate — divided into 400 grams and 171 grams.

Take the larger amounts of chocolate baking chips first. Take chocolate and put into microwave safe bowl. Microwave for 30 seconds and melt them in the microwave. Stir well. The first or larger amount may need a second 30 second cooking. The hot melted pieces will melt the unmelted ones. Stir after each heating. Bowl will be HOT! Don’t over cook the chocolate.

Remove & add vanilla 2 tsp. Stir. Add 8 tsp sugar. Stir.

Turn out onto parchment paper on cookie sheet. Spread chocolate with spatula. Spread nut and pretzel mix out over it evenly. Gently press it into chocolate.

Take remaining chocolate and put into same bowl. Microwave for 30 seconds. Stir well. The hot melted pieces will melt the unmelted ones. Don’t over cook the chocolate. Add 1 tsp vanilla and 3 tsp sugar. Stir well. Drizzle over the surface and spread out. It will almost cover the whole nut layer.

Put into icebox for for 30 to 45 minutes to harden. Afterward, cut into small pieces about 1” x 1 1/2”. It will keep in an airtight container for about two weeks.

Serving Size: Makes 36 pieces appropriately 1 inch by 1 1/2 inch.

Number of Servings: 36

As you can see, making chocolate bark with broken pretzels, pieces of dried fruit, and nuts comes together much like a coral reef: it gets all the various pieces cemented with a binding agent, which in the kitchen is chocolate. I don’t suggest you go out into the sea and nibble on a coral reef. It wouldn’t be good for the pearly whites.

The Benefits of Coral Reefs

Scientists have discovered that many parts of a coral reef can be harvested to make medications. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, coral reefs are emerging as the medicine cabinets of the 21st century: “Coral reef plants and animals are important sources of new medicines being developed to treat cancer, arthritis, human bacterial infections, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, viruses, and other diseases.”

Coral reefs are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet. There are often more types of fish living in a two-acre area of healthy coral reef than there are species of birds in all of North America!

Coral reefs help to improve the quality of the surrounding water. They do this by filtering out things floating in the ocean, which leads to cleaner water. In addition to protecting shorelines, coral reefs are immensely valuable to the fishing and tourism industries. According to the World Resources Institute, the destruction of one kilometer of coral reef equals a loss of between $137,000 to $1,200,000 over a 25-year period. And yet, they estimate some 60% of the world’s coral reefs are currently threatened by human activity.

Dark chocolate has its own benefits to humankind. Without it, some of us aren’t fit for civilized company! We don’t need a massive shark bite full of this calming food to bring us into a harmonious state. This is because chocolate has multiple chemicals that produce positive feelings in us. Phenylethylamine is sometimes called “the love drug”, because it arouses feelings similar to those that occur when one is in love. Another neurotransmitter, serotonin, is a mood-lifter, as well. One chemical that causes the release of serotonin into the brain is tryptophan, found in (wait for it!) chocolate!

If chocolate were a drug, we might need a prescription. Or we might find the law regulating how much chocolate we could have in our candies. As far as I’m concerned, the darker the better, but small children often prefer milk chocolate due to the greater sugar and milk content. Dark chocolate has probiotics and prebiotics, magnesium, iron, copper, and antioxidants. Even commercial dark chocolate bars will have large amounts of sugar, so not all dark chocolate is good for people with diabetes or weight issues. Look for 15 g carbohydrates per serving as a limit. Chocolate is a snack treat, not a meal.

A little afternoon pickmeup or as a side nibble with coffee and a friend, and your mood will be adjusted in no time. Then you can go back to swimming with the sharks and they can’t bite you, since you now have on your impervious dark chocolate shark repellent suit. Enjoy!

Joy and Peace,

Cornie

Nutrition Facts

Servings Per Recipe: 36

Serving Size: 1 serving

Amount Per Serving

Calories

127.9

Total Fat

8.1 g

Saturated Fat

3.9 g

Polyunsaturated Fat

0.4 g

Monounsaturated Fat

0.8 g

Cholesterol

0.0 mg

Sodium

65.2 mg

Potassium

39.4 mg

Total Carbohydrate

15.1 g

Dietary Fiber

1.6 g

Sugars

9.1 g

Protein

2.1 g

Vitamin A

2.2 %

Vitamin B-12

0.0 %

Vitamin B-6

2.2 %

Vitamin C

0.3 %

Vitamin D

0.0 %

Vitamin E

0.0 %

Calcium

0.4 %

Copper

2.2 %

Folate

0.0 %

Iron

7.1 %

Magnesium

0.9 %

Manganese

2.2 %

Niacin

0.0 %

Pantothenic Acid

0.0 %

Phosphorus

1.7 %

Riboflavin

0.0 %

Selenium

0.0 %

Thiamin

1.7 %

Zinc

Summer Bounty Bowl

Summer Bounty Bowl

Summer is in full bloom here in Arkansas in the middle of July. We now have local crops in our grocery stores, and the tomatoes are especially sweet. A few more days on the counter top in the kitchen and they are sugar bombs!

The summer squashes are also excellent. I like the zucchini and crook neck yellow squashes small, so they will cook on the al dente side. Nothing beats the taste of corn on the cob cooked in its own husk. I take off a few outer leaves, rinse the whole under cool water, and place it on a folded paper towel in the microwave. I set the timer for 3 1/2 minutes and go about my business of cooking dinner.

I took 4 ounces of 10% fat ground beef for my cast iron frying pan. As I stirred it on medium high heat, I looked for the container of leftovers with 1/2 cup each of zucchini and summer squash, 3 ounces of tomatoes, 1/4 onion and mixed Italian herbs. Once the meat was almost brown, I added this to the pan. It heated quickly. I was glad for this, since my grocery shopping jaunt had gone longer than I planned, due to a sudden rain shower.

Not long after, I heard the microwave sound. The paper towel is handy for grabbing that hot cob! It steams well inside its own husk. Once I peeled it back, I had a handle to hold the cob upright in the pan. I took a knife and cut the kernels off into the meat mixture. By the time I threw away the cob and stirred the whole pan about a few times, the dish was ready to plate (or bowl, in this case). I used 3/4 ounce cheese to top it, and emptied the remnants of a bag of shredded cheese. It was a very filling supper. Tasty, too, or my appetite just has a much sharper edge these days!

This was a 425 calorie meal, and took no longer than 15 minutes to prepare and cook, with 28 g carbohydrates, 20 g fat, and 33 g protein. It fits into a Mediterranean diet, and can fit into a low carbohydrate food plan. Paleo diets restrict corn because it’s a grain, and grains, as well as beans and legumes, are all excluded foods. Of course, paleo allows sweet potatoes, which have a higher carb content per cup (46 g) than corn (18 g), but no one ever said the paleo diet ever made scientific sense, anthropological sense, or medical sense.

In fact, our bodies are no longer the same as Stone Age people’s, just as our world has advanced beyond that era also. One aspect this diet fantasy does get correct is its insistence on whole or minimally processed foods. Of course, this is a characteristic of all healthy eating plans. The best plans, however, are the ones which have the least restrictions and the very best plans are the ones which you will stick to for a lifetime.

You heard right–lifetime compliance. We might fall off the wagon on a vacation or for a weekend, but not for longer. Especially if we have to watch our blood sugar closely. We know the damage from unrestrained highs or lows it can cause. I once hit a telephone pole at 5 mph while on vacation in a small town in North Carolina. I had an extra 10 days while my car was repaired before I got to come home, all because I didn’t eat before I decided to drive. I’m now trained. I was fortunate not to hit another vehicle or person. I am also much more sensitive to how I feel as my blood sugar drops, since I have the traumatic memory of the thud and crash connected to the swooning feeling of my body.

Only a few scientific studies have been organized to investigate the benefits of a paleo diet for diabetes, but their samples have been small and the time short. Not enough information exists to recommend the paleo diet for other than a short term weight loss diet. It’s not a lifetime healthy eating plan due to the elimination of dairy (calcium), and grains and legumes (nutrient dense fiber and vitamin sources).

With the hot weather outside, I’ll be making tuna salad, chicken salad, and cold, quick meals. Baking will have to wait for cooler weather! Friday might be 101F, with heat factors higher. Crunchy apples and raisins will likely appear in the meat salads. And yogurt, for somehow it tastes cooler than a cloying mayonnaise dressing.

Joy and peace to all,

Cornie

Good article on Stone Age humanity here:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-paleo-diet-half-baked-how-hunter-gatherer-really-eat/

Information on scientific studies here:

https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2016/205/4/paleo-diet-and-diabetes

TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS TREES

Some of us toss out the living room Christmas tree on December 26th, because it’s been up since Thanksgiving Day. Christmas Day begins the 12 days of Christmas, a celebration that ends on January 6th with the visit of the wise men to the baby Jesus’s birthplace. You can make variations of the Christmas tree with pancakes and eat them for supper or breakfast.

Make them with whole wheat flour and get the whole grain benefits. Cornie’s BASIC PANCAKE RECIPE is at the link below. SparkRecipes requires a free account to login, but it gets you access to a recipe calculator. This is a handy tool you can use to input your own recipes and figure the calories, carbs, and protein figures of your meals.

https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=2829882

In the new year, we can be more conscious of our health by knowing what we eat and how it affects our health. I reworked my traditional family recipes to cut the fat, salt, and carbohydrates so I could avoid the diabetes which runs in my family. This isn’t something a person can do cold turkey or make the change all at once, but by cutting back these three things a little at a time over a period of a year, my tastebuds adjusted to the new normal.

Best wishes for the days to come! Better health for all of us!

Love, Cornie